web analytics
Floor design and materials - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community



Forno Bravo Forum Thread Message

Hello, Forno Bravo Community Forum Members!

The Forno Bravo team has heard the feedback in regards to the community forum. We wanted to take the time to re-enforce our commitment to a fully engaged Forum with professional moderation.

Our top priority as a company is to fix all forum errors and issues that you are experiencing. As we are swiftly working on these problems, we want to say that we highly value the Forum Bravo Community Forum and every single community forum member.

We have set up this thread so that every member can address any concerns, issues and questions about the forum. Please feel free to ask whatever you would like in regards to the forum; let us know what issues you are experiencing so we can work on resolving them as fast as possible. However, we stress that we would like constructive engagement, so please be specific about the issue you are experiencing.

Thank you for all of your patience and continued support.

Link to topic: http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...with-new-forum
See more
See less

Floor design and materials

  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Floor design and materials

    I've just made an oven floor that works from an insulation perspective, as below it, after hours of really hot fire, it's still cold.

    From the bottom:
    1) Sheet steel ( but when I build a Pompeii oven it will be wood decking )
    2) About 75mm 5:1 vermiculite grade 4 and Portland cement. I' d read that was better for structural integrity.
    3) A course of ordinary block paving bricks. They are only about 24 pence each. Then with the bricks on the vermicrete, I left 48 hours to cure. My thinking is that if the bricks crack, I'm not concerned, they are entirely surrounded and going nowhere.
    4) 25mm heat resist screed, tamped down flat. 48 hours curing time.
    5) Loose laid quarry tiles. These can just be picked out and replaced.

    The fire is lit on the quarry tiles.

    So far so good, and it holds heat for a couple of hours.

    The photo shows two ovens.
    1) The Pizza Oven cooking area on the top.
    2). The fire lighting area with heat resist screed over insulation and block paving, the quarry tiles not yet on.

    It's not brilliant, but heat goes up from the bottom area both directly onto the top quarry tiles - and also round the sides and back inner wall and down onto the tiles. Sadly, the top door needs to be closed to cook pizza in3 minutes, which makes them taste too smokey to begin with. But it's way better than with no insulation.

    A question or two:
    1) do you think this will be OK for the floor of a Pompeii style?
    2) Is there a difference between quarry tiles and terracotta tiles?

    Thanks. Feel free to laugh!
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Floor design and materials

    Being from Manchester I know you are short on space, but really?

    Build a proper oven man.
    The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

    My Build.



    • #3
      Re: Floor design and materials

      Originally posted by brickie in oz View Post
      Being from Manchester I know you are short on space, but really?

      Build a proper oven man.
      I'm going to! Just wanted to bring an old thing back from disuse, and do some personal learning with the screed and vermiculite .

      Now I can mix both. So a Pompeii style is going to happen.