web analytics
Gauge or sand mold - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

Announcement

Collapse

Forum Issues Update

Things are progressing in getting things back in order on the Forum! User avatars should be showing up. Attachment and inline images are in the process of being uploaded. We are still looking for a migration path for the Photoplog gallery. Thank you for your patience!
See more
See less

Gauge or sand mold

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gauge or sand mold

    I can't decide whether to use a gauge or a sand mold to shape my dome.
    If using a gauge I imagine that you could really only do one course of bricks at a time allowing time in between for mortar to set. A sand mold looks to me like you could pretty much do the whole dome at once.
    I'm not sure that I could get a good even shape using sand. The gauge method looks much more accurate.
    Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Gauge or sand mold

    Or you could use a "fan" form system such as I did and as Terry did:

    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f50/...tml#post118686


    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f21/...ucer-3033.html

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Gauge or sand mold

      My two cents - I used a piece of plywood (quarter circle) castored in the center. The only problem I can see using a mold is not being able to clean and properly mortar the inner seams and bricks. The homebrew sets pretty quickly, so I can't imagine a situation where you would need to slow down because of the gauge. I think you'll find keeping the inside of the dome clean as you go would be the better route.
      Leigh

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Gauge or sand mold

        You can't build your dome "all at once". It's pretty much one brick at a time.
        My geodesic oven project: part 1, part 2

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Gauge or sand mold

          building a sand dome is easier than it sounds. I've done three and getting the form right is quite easy. You need to have damp sand and simply tap the sides with the flat of a trowel and look at the profile by eye. A stck of the required height placed in the centre is useful to get the correct height. A few polystyrene boxes in the middle saves on sand.
          Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Gauge or sand mold

            Hello,

            You can have the best of both worlds by starting with a plywood gauge then finish with a sand mold when you get near the top. Many have done it this way successfully.

            Cheers,
            Bob

            Here is the link to my oven number 1 construction photos!

            Here is the link to my oven number 2 construction photos!

            Comment

            Working...
            X