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Hardiboard thickness - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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  • Hardiboard thickness

    OK, the roof trusses are made but not up yet. Do most people who have built an enclosure for their oven use 1/2" or 1/4" hardiboard? Is there an advantage of one over the other?

    Also, what about the joints? Some type of modified thinset with mesh tape? I plan on waterproofing my enclosure, and maybe the base (do I need the base waterproofed?), before sticking on the thin brick and stone. Redgard? I think that is the material Tscar recommended in another thread.

    Man, that is a lot of questions in a small space.

    Thanks guys.

    David
    "Leave the gun. Take the cannoli." - Peter Clemenza

  • #2
    Re: Hardiboard thickness

    Originally posted by Dino69 View Post
    Do most people who have built an enclosure for their oven use 1/2" or 1/4" hardiboard?
    It would all depend on the stud spacings, there are charts available on the internet, do a google.
    The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

    My Build.

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    • #3
      Re: Hardiboard thickness

      Thanks, Brickie.

      Spacing is a little under 16in and I am putting metal on the roof. I will google it.

      Maybe I will use 1/4" for the roof and 1/2" for the walls as a base for my thin brick and stone. Thanks again.

      David
      "Leave the gun. Take the cannoli." - Peter Clemenza

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Hardiboard thickness

        Originally posted by Dino69 View Post
        Thanks, Brickie.

        Spacing is a little under 16in and I am putting metal on the roof. I will google it.

        Maybe I will use 1/4" for the roof and 1/2" for the walls as a base for my thin brick and stone. Thanks again.

        David
        David, do you get any snow or wind load there?

        You will want to consider that and space your roof support with that in mind.

        Metal roofs do not require backer board in most cases, just support at regular spacing defined by the manufacturer. So the roof sheathing is just there to space the studs and keep things from moving around.

        You will want to have the metal roof screw down points go into a metal stud and not just into the backer board as the backer board does not hold screws well.

        Chip
        Last edited by mrchipster; 10-25-2012, 08:30 AM.
        Chip

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        • #5
          Re: Hardiboard thickness

          David:

          What would you gaining by going 1/4" other than saving $5-10 in material? I went with with the 1/2 inch on my roof. I shingled my roof, so I needed something that would hold a screw. I would have used plywood, however I wanted to be able to claim "zero-combustibles" . I was going to do the metal roof, but then I looked into the cost, so I went with asphalt shingles....

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          • #6
            Re: Hardiboard thickness

            Chip,

            Thanks for the reply. I get a little snow but not a ton, except for the occassional Nor'easter which could dump a foot or two. If that happens I will pull the snow right off of the oven roof. But with a 10/12 pitch I doubt that will be needed.

            But I do get wind. I live on a big ol' hil and there is always a breeze. And when it feels like it that breeze can get nasty. I hope to screw into anything that will hold well. Studs, cross bracing, board...

            hey, Jeeppiper.

            When you put it that way I have to agree. $10-$15 compared to the cost and time, I have plenty of both, in my build is not much. I thought about plywood also and came to the same "zero combustible" conclusion. Ended up with a 36" wide metal panel (Fabral Grand Rib 3.) I liked the standing seam better but it was three times as much.

            Have you had any issues with screws holding in your board? How far apart are your roof trusses?

            David
            "Leave the gun. Take the cannoli." - Peter Clemenza

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Hardiboard thickness

              The rule of thumb for hardi-backer is: If it is applied over something else (like sheetrock or plywood), then 1/4" is fine. Otherwise 1/2" or 5/8".

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              • #8
                Re: Hardiboard thickness

                Thanks, Tscarborough.

                Seems like 1/2" is the way to go.
                "Leave the gun. Take the cannoli." - Peter Clemenza

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