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Two-day Bread Bake - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community



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Two-day Bread Bake

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  • Two-day Bread Bake


    Here's a brief log of a two-day bread bake from last week. It shows, in part, how a high mass oven works, something I'm still exploring.


    Hearth brick at 203 from previous bake. Fire started at 7 AM; two full burns. Hearth at 920 F by noon. Rake out, door in place and moderate for two hours. Brush out, spray heavily with a garden sprayer to generate steam, replace door. Swab deck. Begin bake at 575 F air temp. First in (sprayed over the breads just after loading): 8 baguette, time 18 minutes to an internal temp of 205 F. Next in (sprayed): 8 olive/thyme boule, time 22 minutes. Next in (sprayed): 8 sourdough boule, time 25 minutes. Next in (sprayed): 8 rye boule, time 25 minutes. All boule weighed in a 1 kilogram and reached an internal temp of 205-210.


    Six-thirty AM: hearth brick at 365 F, slab at 343, dome at 403, cladding at 409. Small fire started at 7 AM. Nine AM: hearth at 817, slab at 333, cladding at 411, dome at 734. Fire still burning. Eleven AM: rake out, door in place, moderate for two hours. Swab deck, spray. One PM: first bake of enriched kaiser rolls, 42 at a time on 7 sheet pans, no spraying over these. Hearth at 617, slab at 352, dome at 580, cladding at 481; air temp 550 F. Time: 12 minutes to an internal temp of 190 F. Second bake of 42 rolls at 3:30 PM. Time 12 minutes to an internal temp of 200 F. After the second bake: hearth 493, slab 377, dome 504, cladding 485. Third bake at 4:15. Bake time: 12 minutes to an internal temp of 195. After the bake: hearth at 453, slab 384, dome 474, cladding 475.

    Nine-thirty PM: Air temp 350 with door off. Ten pound seared beef roast with beef stock and wine halfway up the meat (plus onions, carrots, celery, bay, etc.) in a heavy, lidded Le Crueset oval roaster goes in, not directly on the brick, but on a rack. Left the door off to lower heat overnight.

    Sunday: Roast out at 8 AM. Some tender.

    This might be of interest to members branching out into bread baking. It's certainly fascinating to see how retained heat in a high mass oven performs.

    "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

  • #2
    Very interesting Jim,

    How hot was the oven after the roast came on on Sunday?

    My Oven Thread:


    • #3


      Left the door off overnight, so the hearth was at 250 F when I took out the roast. Put the door back on as an experiment, and the hearth temp rose to 275 in about an hour.

      "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827