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Firing after winter in the east - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Forno Bravo Forum Community,

You will notice a new forum at the top of the main page called, "Ask Me Anything". This forum will be used for live one hour "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) sessions hosted by people who are knowledgeable in different areas pertaining to wood fired ovens. How it works:
- Each AMA will have a "sticky" thread where the community can post questions they would like answered during the live session. This will allow everyone to participate even if you can't be online for the live session. These questions will not be answered by the host until the live AMA; if you need an answer quickly, you should post it in the appropriate Forum area for the community to respond.
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To kick off our AMA feature, we have invited author, chef and master bread maker and host of Pizza Quest, Peter Reinhart, to be our first host! Peter will be in the Forum on Monday, February 15th, from 7:00 - 8:00 pm EST. If you are unable to be online during the live session, you can post your questions in the sticky post. Peter will answer those questions during the live session on February 15th. You can view Peter's answers to your questions as well as what happened during the live session in the session thread.

We hope you enjoy this new feature! Please let us know if there is a topic that you'd like to have as an AMA and we'll look for a host!

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Firing after winter in the east

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  • Firing after winter in the east

    I have had this oven now since the fall. Been a great oven,, This will be the first time to fire since it was dry .... What should I do...Should I just build a small fire and let it burn.. or burn several fires over time.. Water is my main concern...... moist here in the east.. .lost of rain and snow this winter.

    Thanks

    Mike

  • #2
    Re: Firing after winter in the east

    Hi Mike,

    Two things:

    First, you need to take a good look and see if water got into the oven anywhere. If there are any signs of moisture, you should work out how it got in, and stop it from happening in the future.

    If there are any signs of water, you should re-start the oven very slowly. Two 8 hour days with a small fire (300-400F day one, followed by 500F on day two) should slowly bake out any water. If you light a fully hot fire (700F+) and the floor or dome are still wet, you run the risk of damaging the oven, or seriously shortening the life of the floor.

    Second, If the oven is just damp from a damp winter, you should still fire the oven for 8 hours at a low temperature (300-400F) before bringing it up to high heat.

    Heidi

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    • #3
      Re: Firing after winter in the east

      thanks Heidi for you response.. have been out of town

      Mike

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      • #4
        Re: Firing after winter in the east

        No problem glad I was able to help.

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        • #5
          Re: Firing after winter in the east

          If you think you have moisture inside (and you certainly will have some after not using through the winter), re-cure it. Err on the side of doing it slowly - small long duration fires for the first 3 or 4 firings, try not to get it over about 300 F.

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          • #6
            Re: Firing after winter in the east

            Originally posted by HeidiL2011 View Post
            Second, If the oven is just damp from a damp winter, you should still fire the oven for 8 hours at a low temperature (300-400F) before bringing it up to high heat.

            Heidi
            Contrary to what one would conclude based on conventional wisdom, winter is the dryest season of the year with regard to air. Barring any physical leaks in the oven that allow rain or melt water in, the oven should be dryer in the winter than it is in the summer. Cold air simply can not hold as much moisture as warm air. For that same reason, tools in our sheds rust in the summer, not the winter and we run humidifers in the winter and dehumidifers in the summer

            I can see where accumulated snow melt in the landing area could be a problem and will be fabricating a rain/snow cover for my oven landing/opening.
            Last edited by BeanAnimal; 04-04-2011, 09:49 AM.

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            • #7
              Re: Firing after winter in the east

              I fired mine up yesterday after a pretty nasty winter (even more snow later this week). I was going to take it slow but decided to go for it. I didnít hear anything blow out so I think I am good.
              Check out my pictures here:
              http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/les-build-4207.html

              If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.

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              • #8
                Re: Firing after winter in the east

                Moisture in the insulation is a double whammy. First, it takes a lot of Btu's to dry it out. Second, until it is dry its insulation value is much lower so it take a lot more BTU's to bring it up to temperature and it will not hold the heat.

                If you have an igloo style, you can check by feeling the outside after firing. If it has moisture in the insulation layer it will, paradoxically, feel warmer than it would normally. This is caused by steam in the insulation layer. I have a small vent at the top that communicates thru the stucco to the vermicrete. During late winter/spring firing, it is typical to see steam coming out of the vent.
                Last edited by Neil2; 04-07-2011, 01:56 PM.

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