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Cold WFO steam injection test - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Cold WFO steam injection test

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  • Cold WFO steam injection test

    Let's see if I can figure out the video thing.

    I just tested the steam injection system on the wfo. I did the test on a cold oven just to watch the steam and flow. In a hot oven the sound disappears and you can't see the steam cloud so it's hard to tell what's going on. In the video the steam is running at 8 psi. I think I would be able to increase the pressure but that will take more testing.

    Next will be testing with a load of bread.

    http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3Vixcv7pSs&feature=youtu.be
    Last edited by Faith In Virginia; 06-10-2013, 01:50 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

    Very cool! So where does it get injected and what are you using to generate the steam?

    Kevin

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    • #3
      Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

      Hi Faith,

      I want one, would only need a short burst, that one is running like a car wash. Cool!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

        That looks really good, Faith!

        Methinks you will only need ten to 15 seconds or so, maybe less based on my experience with steam injection at SFBI.

        I think I would start by steaming about 15 seconds, then loading. sealing up and 15 more.

        Look forward to seeing the results of your experiment. I am expecting an increased oven spring and a thicker crust when you get it worked out.

        Bravo!
        Jay

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        • #5
          Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

          Jay, that is what I'm going after, increased spring and thicker crust. I think that heavy steaming while loading will cure some of my ills, then I'll figure for how much longer after the door goes on. Cool thing is I can have the steam injection system running idle then open a valve for steam. Some of the better bread books make mention of steaming times and such so I'll start there.

          I will work on showing you all the system here in just a moment...stupid easy and 99% of the materials I already owned.

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          • #6
            Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

            Faith,

            I still trying to figure how to cook pizzas but this is very interesting for my next goal of baking bread. Gonna be watching your results.

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            • #7
              Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

              Okay this is how I did the steam injection system.

              First: I had a turkey fryer (one of those out door things that burn down lots of houses) For my placement I cut down the legs a bit so the final tubing would run flat. When I bought this fryer I had no idea that it took something like $100 just in oil to fry the bird. So I use it once and it has been sitting for years. Now it has a real purpose.

              Second: I used my loved Pressure Caner. Please note NONE OF THE SAFETY FEATURES HAVE BEEN REMOVED. (don't blow your self up if you try this) the safety pop is still in the lid and the rattler is still on top. So follow the safety instructions that came with your caner. You can see that I removed the rattler nipple and put in an extension, tee, then put the nipple back on. So no new holes and I can still use my caner when the fall gets here.

              Third: from the tee I added a valve once the caner gets to pressure I open the valve. If I don't need steam the rattler will let off bits of steam pressure as if I were caning something.

              I insulated the tubing (I had copper so I used it) that helps keeps steam steam until it gets to the oven.

              I placed the injection site on the left side of my oven then put a bend in the tubing towards the back of the oven, this way the steam pressure would start a circulation of the steam. I will look to see if any spots get missed in the oven when I start baking bread .

              In a hot oven I know the characteristics of the steam will change. First the hissing disappears and the visible steam disappears so the only indication of circulation will be the bread itself when it comes out of the oven.
              Attached Files
              Last edited by Faith In Virginia; 06-10-2013, 04:22 PM.

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              • #8
                Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                Hi Faith,

                I don't think I have the courage to purposely put a hole in my oven.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                  Originally posted by Laurentius View Post
                  Hi Faith,

                  I don't think I have the courage to purposely put a hole in my oven.
                  LOL. it's a small hole and besides you purposely put a big hole in your oven. You know the hole that you put the door in.

                  I did run the tube through the door on the first test...but it was a real pain in the butt.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                    Originally posted by Faith In Virginia View Post
                    LOL. it's a small hole and besides you purposely put a big hole in your oven. You know the hole that you put the door in.

                    I did run the tube through the door on the first test...but it was a real pain in the butt.
                    Heheheheheehh, but did I have a chose on that one.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                      Faith,

                      You know that the more you fill your oven the lease you will need this, its great for 1 to 6 loaves.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                        Well what I found... even with a full oven ... it's the time it takes to load the first loaf to the last, the first loaf's crust is almost set. I started to pay attention to my ugly loaf's and they were the first in the oven. So I'm thinking that if I can blast steam while loading I can counter some of that effect.

                        I also can use it for smaller batches to give that good crust.

                        The gauge tells you the actual pressure with in the pot. The rattler is the round thing on top of the valve with 5- 10-15 printed on it. With a pressure caner that rattler will go tink, tink, tink, tink, when the pot gets up to the selected pressure of the rattler ( it acts like a pressure regulator) if your tinks get real quick your getting over your desired pressure and that you adjust with the amount of flame under the pot.

                        So when I turn off the valve to the oven the steam goes back to the rattler and that regulates the pressure between uses.

                        If all goes to hell, there is a large safety plug that will pop out around 18 psi and release all pressure in the pot.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                          Hi Faith!

                          Looks good and straightforward.

                          One of the challenges that differs somewhat for each of us is the general humidity level where we are. Here in central Texas it is fairly dry and I have to be pretty careful to avoid excessively drying the skin of my loaves during proofing and especially when loading a bunch of loaves into the WFO - it can only take seconds. One of the great pleasures of my class at SFBI was having the ambient humidity high enough that the skin did not dry quickly, the skin stayed flexible, the steam hit hard in the injection oven, and loaves were wonderful.

                          I suspect you are a somewhat high humidity area most of the time so I would think you will not have to be very concerned about drying the skin, but if you sense any dryness or stiffness to the skin of the loaves when loading you might want to seek to find a way to keep them moister during proofing/loading. Probably not necessary but for me the loaves that are a tad dry show signs when they bake...

                          Really looking forward to the results!
                          Jay

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                          • #14
                            Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                            Most of my bread is proofed in a couche so that does rob some moisture. I have a proofer that has humidity control so I can get it quite moist in the cabinet. When I score the loaf I don't get any sense of drying or skin because the loaf stays in the couche until the last second before it hits the peal.

                            I do know that by the time the last loaf goes into the oven the first loaf has sprung and the crust is starting to brown. So those loaves do not get any benefit of steam due to a full oven load.

                            I also see a benefit of the steam injection for the things that don't have the large dough mass that bread does such as pastries and croissants.

                            This also has me thinking my next oven will have a lower ceiling so that the steam generated will have less cubic feet of air space to get lost in.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Cold WFO steam injection test

                              Well hot damn! That is very cool!! A Pompeii steamer. I can't wait to see the baking results.

                              Thanks

                              Chris

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