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Temperature measurement - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Temperature measurement

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  • Temperature measurement

    I've seen these pyrometers on Ebay for just a few dollars.

    I'm planning my oven and want to have some temperature monitoring.

    Ive seen most commercial wood fired ovens have a digital read out of temperature.

    I guess these use a thermocouple in the oven and an A/D converter, and finally a display. This is not to complicated but simpler and quicker would be to use the hand held laser pyrometer, and would allow me to measure temperature on all the bits of the oven I can see from the door.

    Any wisdom here on the subject ?

  • #2
    Re: Temperature measurement

    I'm thinking of some kind of reasonably priced built-in temperature monitor. Maybe as simple as in the door. I'll check ebay.
    Lee B.
    DFW area, Texas, USA

    If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
    Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
    An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Temperature measurement

      Infrared thermometers are widely available in a bunch of price ranges. Be sure you get one that measures up to 1000f. I don't have one, and you don't really need one for ordinary use: I judge pizza temperatures by carbon burn-off, and have a cheap oven thermometer for retained heat baking.

      A quick forum search showed a number of threads about buying an infrared gun, but a lot fewer about using one.

      The same things goes with the built in thermocouples: you'll find a lot about installing them, less about using them, i suspect for the same reason.
      My geodesic oven project: part 1, part 2

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Temperature measurement

        Originally posted by dmun View Post
        Infrared thermometers are widely available in a bunch of price ranges. Be sure you get one that measures up to 1000f. I don't have one, and you don't really need one for ordinary use: I judge pizza temperatures by carbon burn-off, and have a cheap oven thermometer for retained heat baking.

        A quick forum search showed a number of threads about buying an infrared gun, but a lot fewer about using one.

        The same things goes with the built in thermocouples: you'll find a lot about installing them, less about using them, i suspect for the same reason.
        Thanks, I have one of those that goes to almost 800 degrees. But, I think I'd like to have a data point at a glance -for knowing oven temp after pizza and before bread. I'm trying to take good advice from you veterans, I'm coming around -seeing your build dmun, I know I should listen to you 99 times out of 100
        Lee B.
        DFW area, Texas, USA

        If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
        Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
        An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

        I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Temperature measurement

          I don't use the IR thermometer all that much not. It was a fun new gadget to play with during the curing process. I now also rely on carbon burn off.
          For retained heat monitoring and management I rely on the door mounted dial thermometer.
          George

          My 34" WFO build

          Weber 22-OTG / Ugly Drum Smoker / 34" WFO

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Temperature measurement

            Originally posted by fxpose View Post
            I don't use the IR thermometer all that much not. It was a fun new gadget to play with during the curing process. I now also rely on carbon burn off.
            For retained heat monitoring and management I rely on the door mounted dial thermometer.
            There, you confirmed to me that is how I want to go: Door mounted dialmometer

            THANKS! Day-in-day-out I find your posts most helpful and informative.
            Lee B.
            DFW area, Texas, USA

            If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
            Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
            An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

            I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Temperature measurement

              Lburou,

              Here is something I learned about the IR thermometer. You'll get consistent results if you can aim the beam directly at a dark, heated, object instead of glancing the beam off the floor. A small piece of firebrick mid-oven should work fine and give an accurate floor temp.

              Cheers,
              Bob

              Here is the link to my oven number 1 construction photos!

              Here is the link to my oven number 2 construction photos!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Temperature measurement

                I installed 4 thermocouples in the floor at different distances from the surface and 2 in the dome. I also got a IR thermometer.

                Now after cooking less then a dozen times I don't use any of it and watch for the carbon to burn off.

                I don't regret putting in the thermocouples. I'm a data junky and like to be able to "See" what's going on with the heat saturation in the oven. However, it's clearly not required.
                My oven build: http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/m...and-13300.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Temperature measurement

                  Originally posted by azpizzanut View Post
                  Lburou,

                  Here is something I learned about the IR thermometer. You'll get consistent results if you can aim the beam directly at a dark, heated, object instead of glancing the beam off the floor. A small piece of firebrick mid-oven should work fine and give an accurate floor temp.

                  Cheers,
                  Thanks, I'll try that when the time comes
                  Lee B.
                  DFW area, Texas, USA

                  If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
                  Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
                  An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

                  I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Temperature measurement

                    Hi All,

                    We cooked our first pizza and bread today. I have an IR thermometer and used it in combination with the cleared dome to give me an idea of when to put on the pizza. After the fire burned down I raked coals over the oven floor, then went in to spread out the dough and dress the pizza. I pushed the coals to the rear of the oven then went inside to bring out the pizza. It came off the peel just fine and began cooking right away. It was easy to see the dough puff and I easily knew when to turn the pie with a small round peel. After another minute I could see the topping bubbling and the cheese begin to brown. One more turn and it was done to perfection. For this cook I used the advice of forum members and the IR to confirm temps. After we ate, my wife formed a loaf of no-knead bread dough and let it rest for 20 min. Then into the oven it went. I used the WAG method to determine the proper temperature, but also relied on forum members guidance that bread can go in the oven after pizza. It worked like a charm. I sprayed about 20 squirts of water into the oven to steam it up for a crispy crust. 30 minutes later we had a nice golden loaf that smelled wonderful. I hope it is this easy every time.

                    Cheers,
                    Bob

                    Here is the link to my oven number 1 construction photos!

                    Here is the link to my oven number 2 construction photos!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Temperature measurement

                      Nice job, Bob! It's nice to know one can follow Forum Members' experiences and guidance to make great results happen. How long did it take to roll out the dough and dress the pizza? I understand if one lets the oven equalize a bit prior to cooking pizza there is a lesser change of scorching the bottom and the floor will recharge a bit faster for a second round.

                      John

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Temperature measurement

                        Originally posted by azpizzanut View Post
                        Hi All,

                        We cooked our first pizza and bread today. I have an IR thermometer and used it in combination with the cleared dome to give me an idea of when to put on the pizza. After the fire burned down I raked coals over the oven floor, then went in to spread out the dough and dress the pizza. I pushed the coals to the rear of the oven then went inside to bring out the pizza. It came off the peel just fine and began cooking right away. It was easy to see the dough puff and I easily knew when to turn the pie with a small round peel. After another minute I could see the topping bubbling and the cheese begin to brown. One more turn and it was done to perfection. For this cook I used the advice of forum members and the IR to confirm temps. After we ate, my wife formed a loaf of no-knead bread dough and let it rest for 20 min. Then into the oven it went. I used the WAG method to determine the proper temperature, but also relied on forum members guidance that bread can go in the oven after pizza. It worked like a charm. I sprayed about 20 squirts of water into the oven to steam it up for a crispy crust. 30 minutes later we had a nice golden loaf that smelled wonderful. I hope it is this easy every time.

                        Cheers,
                        I'm jealous that I'm months away from the first bake in our oven
                        Lee B.
                        DFW area, Texas, USA

                        If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
                        Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
                        An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

                        I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Temperature measurement

                          I used the infrared gun constantly when I was learning the oven, but only use it to show guests the temp now.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Temperature measurement

                            Hi John, Lburou,

                            It didn't take long to roll out the dough and dress the pizza. The dough had spring-back so gave me a hard time getting it right. I ended up putting it on the peel and stretching it by hand. It didn't go directly in the middle of the oven but more towards the front so I could turn the cooked portion to the less hot front bricks. No scorching at all that way. Judging by the huge conflagrations I see in some photos my fire was adequate to clear the dome without being like the gates of hell. A pizza and loaf of bread is all I wanted tonight so didn't make the effort to do more with the fire.

                            Lburou,

                            You'll get there eventually. I thought my build was going slow at first but came together pretty well the past few weeks. We have "no burn" days in our area due to stagnant air in the valley (an inversion layer that you can often see in the distance). I had to wait for a good day to put fire in the oven. It is funny, I had everything ready for three days including kindling, lighter and split wood, just waiting. LOL. Like a kid waiting .........

                            Cheers,
                            Bob

                            Here is the link to my oven number 1 construction photos!

                            Here is the link to my oven number 2 construction photos!

                            Comment

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