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Hello from Spain - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community



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Hello from Spain

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  • Hello from Spain

    Hi everybody from the mediterranean coast of Spain. I have been reading the forum and learning in order to build my first oven project. I'm already in the brainstorming stage. The initial idea is to make a kind of Pompeii oven with separate firebox. The use of the oven will be mainly for roasting, so the separate firebox for play with the fire in every step of the roasting process. It's difficult to find out information about firebox design and calculations. So I have to investigate a little bit more.
    All the ways I'll post all the progress in the project.

    Last edited by Dmendo; 01-30-2012, 11:39 AM. Reason: Duplicated message

  • #2
    Re: Hello from Spain


    When you read about the Italian style oven here on fornobravo.com, you will come to see that roasting is easily accomplished with the oven design as it is (without a firebox). Click on the link at the end of the green sentence in my signature for more information and a free download of the oven plans.
    Lee B.
    DFW area, Texas, USA

    If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
    Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
    An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.


    • #3
      Re: Hello from Spain

      You need to search for "white oven"
      The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

      My Build.



      • #4
        Re: Hello from Spain

        Aussie Pete

        250th Aussie on this forum...."so i was told"


        • #5
          Re: Hello from Spain

          Thanks Lburou, brikie in oz and aussie pete for the reply, I feel really welcome.
          Lburou: thanks for put this information flag in the thread, it's helpful to have such amount of info all together. The pompeii plans were downloaded at the very beginning of the project. It's a fantastic design and very valuable starting point.

          As brikie in oz has pointed, it smells white oven, but it's a "full-equip" black oven what i try to build.

          Although i'll open a thread for the project (don't know if in starting brick ovens or other type of ovens section), let me expand the idea.

          The goal is to use the less firewood as possible for get the same cooking performance.

          The first way is in a white steel barrel oven, the Chile style. It uses low amount of firewood. The lack is the short life of the drum, together with the fact that using the due amount of firebricks and isolation the investment reaches (if not surpasses) the cost of the more glamourous firebrick dome.

          In terms of coocking performance the brick oven has not opponent. The lack is the low combustion efficiency. So the idea is build a separate firebox with secondary air, the masonry heaters style, for get the best possible combustion and the maximum temperature gases for heat the dome and hearth. The thing becomes more interesting as the usual masonry heaters uses thick firebrick in the core of the firebox as part of the high mass retaining heat system. Here things must be different as we want all the heat to be acummulated in the dome and hearth, not in the combustion chamber. So the firebox walls must be made of refractory alloys (expensive or short life) or ceramic firebrick as thinner as possible and isolated for keep the necessary highest temperature for get the CO well combusted. Is a kind of mix of rocket stove and masonry heaters.
          Another must is keep the fire-in-the-oven capability of the Pompeii design, as the no "rocket fueled" design, by means of dampers or just a pair of detachable bricks.
          Of course, in this stage everything is open to discussion and all ideas are welcome.
          Last edited by Dmendo; 02-02-2012, 04:34 AM.