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bricks - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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I'm Peter Reinhart! Ask Me Anything! Monday, February 15, 2016 7:00-8:00 pm EST

To kick off our AMA feature, we have invited author, chef and master bread maker and host of Pizza Quest, Peter Reinhart, to be our first host! Peter will be in the Forum on Monday, February 15th, from 7:00 - 8:00 pm EST. If you are unable to be online during the live session, you can post your questions in the sticky post. Peter will answer those questions during the live session on February 15th. You can view Peter's answers to your questions as well as what happened during the live session in the session thread.

Ask Me Anything New Forum Feature

You will notice a new forum at the top of the main page called, "Ask Me Anything". This forum will be used for live one hour "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) sessions hosted by people who are knowledgeable in different areas pertaining to wood fired ovens. How it works:
- Each AMA will have a "sticky" thread where the community can post questions they would like answered during the live session. This will allow everyone to participate even if you can't be online for the live session. These questions will not be answered by the host until the live AMA; if you need an answer quickly, you should post it in the appropriate Forum area for the community to respond.
- Another thread will be posted for the live AMA. Registered users who are logged in during the live session can interact with the host by asking questions and receiving responses.
- The live thread will remain in the AMA forum to view after the session.

We hope you enjoy this new feature! Please let us know if there is a topic that you'd like to have as an AMA and we'll look for a host!

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  • bricks

    what every one think i recently took delivery of what they call 1st class bricks and nearly every one of the have a dent and chip, little ones, and over 100 had large chips and corners missing what's the grading in the UK like i have been told in the fire brick industry that's acceptable ???

  • #2
    Re: bricks

    It is not acceptable for firebrick in the U.S., although it won't really hurt anything.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: bricks

      The firebricks I can get here are nearly all perfect, but mind you, we are closer to China so less chipping in transport.
      The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

      My Build.

      Books.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: bricks

        couldent get the company to admit they were not first class bricks but after a threat of a small claims court they have decided to send me a extra 100 bricks that gives me 460 full bricks and i hope one kick ass oven and indoor bbq but what to cut them with the wet cutter are to and the tile saws too little ???? thoughts anyone about a nice piece of kit available in the uk

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: wet morte

          Cement - KLW.A.S.C - Fire Cement - Heat resistant to 1600C
          this is what i bought from kiln linings to set my dome bricks ..i am a little worried as in the FB manual it says not to use a wet premix HELP PLEASE whats the right thing to do is this the same thing

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: wet morte

            Originally posted by smallholder123 View Post
            Cement - KLW.A.S.C - Fire Cement - Heat resistant to 1600C
            this is what i bought from kiln linings to set my dome bricks ..i am a little worried as in the FB manual it says not to use a wet premix HELP PLEASE whats the right thing to do is this the same thing
            How can a premix NOT be wet?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: bricks

              How can a premix NOT be wet?
              When it's dry. Even if it were the right stuff, why pay refractory prices for water?
              My geodesic oven project: part 1, part 2

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: bricks

                Originally posted by dmun View Post
                When it's dry. Even if it were the right stuff, why pay refractory prices for water?
                If its dry it hasnt been mixed, water is part of a mix for final application. No water means it still isnt mixed yet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: wet morte

                  Originally posted by Johnny the oven man View Post
                  How can a premix NOT be wet?
                  Gees John, its like a dry wine or dry beer...........
                  The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                  My Build.

                  Books.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: bricks

                    The problem with wet refractory cement is twofold. First, and not really that important is that it is water soluble. The interior of you oven should never get wet so this isn't a big deal. The important limitation of wet refractory cement is that is designed for joints less than 1/8". It has very fine aggregate and being wet it shrinks a lot, thus it cracks badly at anything over 1/8" in thickness. It also has very little in the way of adhesive properties.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: bricks

                      Originally posted by smallholder123 View Post
                      thoughts anyone about a nice piece of kit available in the uk
                      Hammer and bolster.
                      The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                      My Build.

                      Books.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: bricks

                        Originally posted by Tscarborough View Post
                        The problem with wet refractory cement is twofold. First, and not really that important is that it is water soluble. The interior of you oven should never get wet so this isn't a big deal. The important limitation of wet refractory cement is that is designed for joints less than 1/8". It has very fine aggregate and being wet it shrinks a lot, thus it cracks badly at anything over 1/8" in thickness. It also has very little in the way of adhesive properties.
                        You blokes must have some junk refractories in "the states"
                        We have a product called Tufset Super, used to be called Super 3000, and it sticks like anything. I am fairly sure it was an american product initially.1650f rated, and can, in a pinch, be used in a thicker joint. Failing that, we use a 1350c "fine" grade refractory castable as a mortar. I have been in the refractory business 30 years, and never had an issue with our recommendations. Too many people are claiming that their own homebrews are superior, but I think they are kidding themselves into believing that just because they may have saved a little bit of money equates to a better product. Thats my .2c worth.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: bricks

                          Be that as it may, most wet refractories are designed for other uses than home built ovens. For those purposes they excel, but for the particular demands of a home built oven they are seldom the best choice. Since you have been in the business for 30 years you should also know that there is a great variety of specialized products designed for specific purposes, and commercial kiln refractory is not suitable or required for the tolerances of a home built oven.

                          As for the various homebrew formulas, they would certainly not be appropriate for a commercial kiln, but they are forgiving enough to be suitable for a home oven and are much cheaper and easier to work with.

                          I used wet refractory for my oven, but then, my oven is not a Pompeii, and the specifications fell within the tolerances of my design.

                          In short, for the average person building their own oven to FB specifications, homebrew will always work, as will commercial dry mix refractories, while wet mix MAY work, but then they may not.

                          I will continue to advise on the side of caution (but I only have 20 years in the trade).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: bricks

                            I use a wet pre mixed gloop that is water soluble that I get from John.
                            It is air set and sets in about 20 minutes, if you have to readjust the bricks you have to pry them apart as it grabs in no time flat.
                            Once the tub is opened you have to cover the remaining gloop in the tub with a plastic film to keep it from drying.
                            If it gets too firm you can slacken it up with a drop of water.

                            Ive done my oven at home, my mini oven and the one I have just completed for a customer with the stuff.

                            It sets as hard as a rock and even harder once fired, Ive had no problems with it.
                            The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                            My Build.

                            Books.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: bricks

                              Originally posted by brickie in oz View Post
                              I use a wet pre mixed gloop that is water soluble that I get from John.
                              It is air set and sets in about 20 minutes, if you have to readjust the bricks you have to pry them apart as it grabs in no time flat.
                              Once the tub is opened you have to cover the remaining gloop in the tub with a plastic film to keep it from drying.
                              If it gets too firm you can slacken it up with a drop of water.

                              Ive done my oven at home, my mini oven and the one I have just completed for a customer with the stuff.

                              It sets as hard as a rock and even harder once fired, Ive had no problems with it.
                              Forget the plastic film, just cover it with 40mm of water but dont mix it in. Stays useablle for months, just tip the water of the top when needed.

                              Comment

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