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Southern Tuscany - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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New Forno Bravo Forum Feature

Forno Bravo Forum Community,

You will notice a new forum at the top of the main page called, "Ask Me Anything". This forum will be used for live one hour "Ask Me Anything" (AMA) sessions hosted by people who are knowledgeable in different areas pertaining to wood fired ovens. How it works:
- Each AMA will have a "sticky" thread where the community can post questions they would like answered during the live session. This will allow everyone to participate even if you can't be online for the live session. These questions will not be answered by the host until the live AMA; if you need an answer quickly, you should post it in the appropriate Forum area for the community to respond.
- Another thread will be posted for the live AMA. Registered users who are logged in during the live session can interact with the host by asking questions and receiving responses.
- The live thread will remain in the AMA forum to view after the session.

To kick off our AMA feature, we have invited author, chef and master bread maker and host of Pizza Quest, Peter Reinhart, to be our first host! Peter will be in the Forum on Monday, February 15th, from 7:00 - 8:00 pm EST. If you are unable to be online during the live session, you can post your questions in the sticky post. Peter will answer those questions during the live session on February 15th. You can view Peter's answers to your questions as well as what happened during the live session in the session thread.

We hope you enjoy this new feature! Please let us know if there is a topic that you'd like to have as an AMA and we'll look for a host!

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Southern Tuscany

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  • Southern Tuscany

    We spent a few days south of Siena, and you cannot imagine a place more different than Florence; it's a world apart. It is quiet, rural and the people are happy to talk with you; the food is great and the countryside is beautiful. Miles and miles of wheat fields cover hills and valleys, making it incredibly green in the spring, golden in the autumn, and brown after the fields have been tilled and before the next year's wheat germinates. In a time when a lot of our food comes from far away (melamine from China in our our pet's food), it's very comforting seeing your bread and pasta grow. Where there isn't wheat, there are vines (Chianti colle Sense) and olive trees.

    There are sheep for the percorino, and artichokes, which have a natural rennet for making cheese, plus wild truffles and onions. There are grain mills and fortified granaries -- speaking a food supply, at least we don't have to build a fort around the mill, tracing back grain and milling. Geologically, the area has great clay for making terracotta (the urns held the olive oil) and natural hot mineral spas.

    The area was on pilgrimage route, and there are stories, paintings and poems about the great food going back almost 1,000 years.

    If you are looking for a place to balance the mass tourism of Florence, it's great. And of course we found a wood-fired pizzeria for dinner one night.
    James
    Pizza Ovens
    Outdoor Fireplaces

  • #2
    Re: Southern Tuscany

    Wow - the pastoral shots look fake!

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    • #3
      Re: Southern Tuscany

      It's almost a joke. You turn a corner and the girls yell out -- that's a postcard, no that one -- that's a postcard. No that one.

      For those of us with kids, we joke that the oil, grain, etc. are one of the circle of life kinds of things.

      James
      Pizza Ovens
      Outdoor Fireplaces

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