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Building an oven in Hawaii - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Building an oven in Hawaii

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  • Building an oven in Hawaii

    Does anyone know anyone who built an oven in Hawaii. I need some advice on getting materials. Thanks Paul

  • #2
    Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

    This is one that comes to mind... sounds as if it may be difficult. If you have any questions on using alternative materials, ask away (that volcanic stuff sounds quite good).

    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/c...tion-3192.html

    This one might also be useful.

    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/f...ials-1695.html
    Last edited by Frances; 12-18-2008, 06:59 AM.
    "Building a Brick oven is the most fun anyone can have by themselves." (Terry Pratchett... slightly amended)

    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/p...pics-2610.html
    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f9/p...nues-2991.html

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    • #3
      Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

      What materials are you looking for?

      I posted some nice pics of a hawaiian oven....you have a lot of nice natural stone to use there!
      Sharing life's positives and loving the slow food lane

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      • #4
        Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

        I am looking for insulation materials, vermiculite, refractory mortar. I have nearly completed the stand and will begin the overn soon. thanks

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        • #5
          Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

          I found a supplier in Hawaii who distributes Sairset dry and wet. 55 lb bag and 50 lb tub are both about $45. The distributor here in Hawaii is Pacific refractories in Honolulu. The rep is in California and was kind enough to call me. Pacific refractories also has all grades of firebrick and insulation material.

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          • #6
            Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

            I found a supplier in Hawaii
            That's great, because it's sometimes hard to find refractory materials in hot climates.
            My geodesic oven project: part 1, part 2

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            • #7
              Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

              I have extra fiber blanket, Kaowool. Will it provide insulation if I use it under the fire brick hearth. I know it will compress but I could put 2 layers if it provides any results. Thanks. Paul

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              • #8
                Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                I wouldn't do that. I think part of it's insulating value is in the loft and if you smash it you'll lose that part. You're better off with either board or vermicrete under the floor.
                Elizabeth

                http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/e...html#post41545

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                • #9
                  Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                  I have extra fiber blanket, Kaowool. Will it provide insulation if I use it under the fire brick hearth. I know it will compress but I could put 2 layers if it provides any results
                  If you squish it solid (remember ovens are really heavy) it will have no more insulation value than masonry.
                  My geodesic oven project: part 1, part 2

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                  • #10
                    Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                    dmun, thank you. Will 2 inches of refractory cement "Mizzou" under the hearth provide sufficient insulation to maintain the temperature on the oven floor. I cannot get vermiculite here.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                      I am so perplexed. I am about to build the oven. I have one layer of used brick, which I was told is firebrick but I am not sure. I laid the brick flat so they are 3 inches high. I dry set them and encased them in a perimeter of cement. I have extra Kaowool and also refractory cement Mizzou. Can I use this in combination to insulate the oven floor? I don't want to spend more money but I may have to. Thanks for your thoughts on this. Paul

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                      • #12
                        Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                        First of all, your insulation needs to be DIRECTLY under your hearth firebricks. It sounds like you have set your bricks and are looking to insulate under the hearth slab and bricks, if this is the case, you need to rethink your build. You will use an incredible amount of wood heating both the brick hearth and support slab...you may not be able to reach pizza temps at all. A 3" thick hearth is MORE than enough for retained heat cooking and should work fine if insulated directly under the brick.

                        I don't see how you can use the kaowool blanket for hearth insulation, as dmun mentions, compression will defeat the insulating value...there is a reason it is a spongy blanket - the air within the blanket gives it the insulation value. Save all of your kaowool blanket for dome insulation, more is aways better.

                        With all of the horticulture in Hawaii, there has to be someone who sells perlite or vermiculite - have you tried garden centers? Or maybe a local grower? Any shipping supply companies? Both are used as a lightweight packing material, especially for shipment of liquids in glass bottles. If all else fails, you may have to bite the bullet and have Ceramic fiberboard shipped from the mainland.
                        Seriously, don't rush into completing your oven without acquiring a suitable insulation and remember our mantra - INSULATE, INSULATE, INSULATE - you can never have too much.

                        RT

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                        • #13
                          Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                          I appreciate that and I agree. The fire brick that I mentioned that I laid is not the fire brick I will use for the oven. It is part of the hearth slab nicely placed and tight. I have been looking everywhere for vermiculite and the only one I found here is white pellets. Does refractory concrete provide insulation for the hearth oven floor if I incorporate 2 inches into the hearth slab? Thank you Paul

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                          • #14
                            Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                            Refractory cement only means that it has a high alumina content allowing it to withstand the high temps and withstand the "cycling" of heatup, cool down, heatup.

                            If it specifically says insulating, yes it would be suitable. This type of cement is usually "insulating castable refractory", meaning it has insulating properties added to castable refractory cement. again, castable products are always specifically labeled as such.
                            The bottom line - refractory cement merely mimmicks the properties of firebrick, unless it specifically says insulating in the name, it has no more insulation value than your firebricks.

                            I don't know if this helps, you can order course vemiculite from Uline.com in 4 cubic ft bags. I typed in a quantity of 4 bags ($20 each= $80) and your city (Haleiwa); the cheapest shipping method would be Parcel Poast (and take up to 15 days - shipping from CA) at $87, for a total cost of $167.
                            You may want to CALL Forno Bravo and inquire about the FB ceramic fiber board, they may be able to ship for the same/less total cost, and the board is the best insulator to use. It will also ship from CA.

                            RT

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                            • #15
                              Re: Building an oven in Hawaii

                              thank you RT. Below is the link to the data sheet. Please let me know if you think it is insulating. I do understand what you are saying and appreciate it.

                              http://www.hwr.com/products/datashee...U_CASTABLE.pdf

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