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"Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

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  • "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

    This is sort of carrying on from some comments mentioned in toolmans thread:
    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f3/h...alia-2646.html

    Seeing that we have people from all parts of the globe it would be interesting to hear some of the more unusual types of meats people have tried and your thoughts on it (sorry all you Vego's)

    Kangaroo
    my personal Oz red meat favourite, usually quite lean and goes great with a Plumb style of marinade. Will try it on pizza sometime, maybe with a BBQ sauce. Would make a great roast I guess.

    Crocodile (The big fat Oz ones Steve Irwin used to jump on)
    I felt it was similar to chicken in taste and its a white meat

    ....whilst I haven't tried it yet there is Camel (not native to Aus) but I saw this on TV last night:
    Camel Sirloin Marinated in Lilly Pilly - ABC TV: The Cook and the Chef


    fire away - be interested to hear others experiences.
    Cheers
    Damon

    Build #1

    Build #2 (Current)

  • #2
    Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

    I had dog once...not by choice and I was royally pissed and sick to my stomach. Not because it was bad but because its just not right. If I was stranded with my dogs they would eat me first I could never do that, but it was pretty good.
    http://www.palmisanoconcrete.com

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    • #3
      Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

      I once had a hot dog - don't have a friggen clue what was in it Probably everything that was scrapped off this planet.

      Les...
      Check out my pictures here:
      http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/les-build-4207.html

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      • #4
        Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

        I heard the guy who wrote "The Year of Eating Dangerously" interviewed on the radio. He is British, and he spent a year traveling around the world eating everything imaginable. From bugs in Korea to the hottest peppers in New Mexico. One of things he said over and over was "keep an open mind."

        James
        Pizza Ovens
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        • #5
          Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

          Wait, wait. There's more.

          Dog eats man. There was a news story a few years ago about a car crash somewhere cin the U.S. The driver was killed, and the dog was locked in the car for days and days, so he ate the driver to stay alive.

          I'm not sure I believe the story, but it goes to show that the press is always looking for something crazy to publish.
          James
          Pizza Ovens
          Outdoor Fireplaces

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          • #6
            Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

            While in Scotland I had the Haggis. Glad I can say that I did it but I'll never eat it again.
            Mark

            Life is too short to drink cheap beer

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            • #7
              Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

              All,

              I guess, overall, my two favorite wild meats are caribou and moose.

              With venison, it depends on what the animal ate to determine the degree of gaminess in the meat. Northern deer in this area are very gamey as a result of eating cedar branches and bark, plus lichen. Those from agricultural areas aren't gamey at all. These deer are particularly fond of carrots.

              With bear, it doesn't seem to matter where it comes from; it's extremely fatty and requires boiling, much like a cottage roll. The meat is very dark and strong tasting.

              I first had caribou in a mining camp in the Yukon. In the fall, several guys would go out and shoot one or two. We'd cook the meat over open fires made of boreal pine and pallet wood . It's a very moist, sweet meat that looks and tastes a bit like pork. Later, I was in the restaurant of the Yellowknife Inn, Northwest Territories. The steak (flown in from Calgary) was $25 (this was in the late seventies), and the caribou was $6.95. No brainer.

              Moose, in all its forms, is my all time favorite. Not gamey, assertive but quite pleasant, tender and moist. Makes great roasts and sublime sausages.

              Brauma: I've had Haggis as well, both here and in Scotland. The thing was a bit better in Scotland because the oatmeal is better, but that's about it. Still looked like a white football. As an Irishman, I'd have to say that Robert Burns was on some serious mind altering drugs when he wrote is famous "To a Haggis." In part, he says: "Great chieftan o' the puddin'-race!...While thro' your pores the dews distil/Like amber bead." Not, even with a stiff glass of single malt.

              Jim

              Jim
              Last edited by CanuckJim; 10-11-2007, 07:00 AM.
              "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

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              • #8
                Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                Interesting thread...

                A buddy of mine tells a great story about eating horse in Florence in a restaurant I recommended to him...

                The waiter is translating the menu for him and gets to the Bresola, and says, "this is...how you say...harse...horse..." and continues on with the menu. When he is done my friend says, "and what do you recommend?". The waiter says, "for you, I think the harse".

                The wildest things I have eaten are wild boar and wild hare in Italy. Actually pretty common. I cooked an elk rib roast once that a friend of mine brought over...pretty fabulous.

                I read that Lewis and Clarke ate a lot of Dog during their great adventures, and that they preferred it to venison.

                And Jim, I have a very fond memory of a tuxedo-clad friend of mine on the back of a cruise ship reciting that entire "To a Haggis" bit, with the accent and all . He mightily trumped my effort (The Jabberwocky).

                I definitely have an open mind. I think I would eat anything that was fresh and well prepared. I figure if a food has been around long enough there must be some merit to it. I say, there is no bad food, only badly prepared food.

                Drake
                My Oven Thread:
                http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/d...-oven-633.html

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                • #9
                  Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                  I,ve eaten horse meat in France and it was quite good. They have special butcher shops that can only sell horsemeat. Still popular.

                  Duck egg embryos in the shell in the Phiilipines. Can be a bit crunchy and have features (they are 21 day old embryo's). An acquired taste.

                  Babboon is Malawi Africa. The locals call it bushmeat. They are a mean spirited nasty animal in the wild and I did not particularly enjoy the taste.

                  Had snake soup, snake blood shooter and snake heart in Hong Kong. They kill and skin the sanke right at your table so you know it is fresh. Taste was very good. SOme of your tablemates may be a bit put off by the tableside service.

                  Like most moving parts (liver, sweetbreads, tongue, brains, etc) the French prepare these the best and are true delicacies. Liver cooked in the US is usually tough and rubbery.

                  Have tried sevral times but not fond of kidneys or tripe.

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                  • #10
                    Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                    Yes we have special equine butcher shops in Italy .. great meat, very lean but flavorful.. also donkey , stewed donkey ribs is a delicious specialty of the north..
                    I will eat just about anything once, as long that the locals eat it I would try it as well.
                    One of my favorite game meat is possum , I must say I ate tons of hare and rabbit possum is similar but sweeter and of course boar is super.

                    Originally posted by DrakeRemoray View Post
                    Interesting thread...

                    A buddy of mine tells a great story about eating horse in Florence in a restaurant I recommended to him...

                    The waiter is translating the menu for him and gets to the Bresola, and says, "this is...how you say...harse...horse..." and continues on with the menu. When he is done my friend says, "and what do you recommend?". The waiter says, "for you, I think the harse".

                    The wildest things I have eaten are wild boar and wild hare in Italy. Actually pretty common. I cooked an elk rib roast once that a friend of mine brought over...pretty fabulous.

                    I read that Lewis and Clarke ate a lot of Dog during their great adventures, and that they preferred it to venison.

                    And Jim, I have a very fond memory of a tuxedo-clad friend of mine on the back of a cruise ship reciting that entire "To a Haggis" bit, with the accent and all . He mightily trumped my effort (The Jabberwocky).

                    I definitely have an open mind. I think I would eat anything that was fresh and well prepared. I figure if a food has been around long enough there must be some merit to it. I say, there is no bad food, only badly prepared food.

                    Drake

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                    • #11
                      Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                      Alligator and rabbit are about as adventurous as I've been. Also, buffalo and elk. Now my wife has eaten just about everything you can find down here in the south....including mountain oysters.
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                      • #12
                        Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                        Down around Brownsville somewhere, a long time ago, I had deep fried rattler in a truck stop. Wasn't bad at all, something like frogs' legs, and certainly beat out the corrosive chili. Didn't get over that part real soon, because I was on my way to Mexico at the time. No time to recover.

                        Jim
                        "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

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                        • #13
                          Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                          Some very adventurous things here....

                          As a young lad I grew up in the Riverland country in SA where its all orchards and vineyards - they still had the open channel irrigation back then - we used to fish out some big yabbies (bit like an fresh water prawn but larger and a harder shell). Quite a light taste.
                          You had to watch out for the big brown snakes(very poisonous – killed my dog) that would get stuck in there.....gee if I was more adventurous I could have cooked and tried them as revenge
                          Cheers
                          Damon

                          Build #1

                          Build #2 (Current)

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                          • #14
                            Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                            A few Northern Cree delicacies...
                            My list is long and varied now that I think of it. I spent a lot of time in fire camps with traditional elders cooking. They may have been respected elders, but most were not exceptional cooks.
                            Muskrat.. sauted, it was sort of like stringy chicken.
                            Rabbits Head Stew - most aboriginals traditionally boiled thier meats. It was common to hear of boiled pork chops, boiled bacon, boiled hamberger, etc. I think I experienced them all and all are less appetizing than they sound.... Rabbits Head stew was special, everything went into the pot, which was very large, and invaribly a rabbit skull would boil to the surface, grinning at you with its buck teeth and gray, cloudy eyes. Not my favorite meal, but it was memorable.
                            Various smoked, dried meats, all done on an open fire with natural smoke and no additives. Most common was dried rabbit and dried moose.
                            Most game meats, all were good, if well handled and butchered. Sometimes a little gamey.
                            Roasted Moose Nose.... considered to be a rare delicacy and if offered to you, it is a rare gift.
                            Roasted marrow, all the big bones are tossed into a fire then cracked to extract the marrow when cooked.
                            Bannock, a fried bread is alway served with any of the above.

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                            • #15
                              Re: "Non Ordinary" meats you have eaten

                              Spunkoid

                              You mentioned rabbit's head stew.......how about rolled pig's face (Porchetta di Testa)

                              ........

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                              http://lh6.ggpht.com/_BodhAjrnKgk/Su...0/P1010008.JPG

                              Not so much of an unusual meat.....just a different approach to eating it.

                              Terry
                              Honi soit qui mal y pense

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