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  • San Marzano

    What makes these certified? I thought only the consortium in Italy can certify San Marzano tomatoes.

    And why are they labels printed in the United States and not in Italy?

    This seems like fraud to me.
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  • #2
    Re: San Marzano

    "Certified" implies a third party inspected and approved a product or process by virtue of it meeting a predetermined standard. Unless the actual standard is referenced, the word Certified means essentially nothing. Kind of like the word 'better!'

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: San Marzano

      For more concerning Cento Tomatoes go here: Tomatoes and tomatoe products

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: San Marzano

        If you were going to ship tomatoes across the world, why would you want to ship them in heavy, small containers? You ship them in bulk, and can them on location (location being the US in this case).

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: San Marzano

          Hi BartRicci.

          San Marzano DOP tomatoes are certified by the European Union and can only grow in a specific region of Italy outside Naples -- just like real Champagne can only come from the Champagne region of France.

          That does not stop US producers from using the name, even though the product is different. It's like a US company calling a wine Chablis, which is also a controlled name in Europe, and "real" Chablis can only come from a specific region in France

          Hope this information helps.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: San Marzano

            I read a thread here reporting that San Marzano tomato seeds are availabile here in the USA......You can grow them anywhere.
            Lee B.
            DFW area, Texas, USA

            If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
            Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
            An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

            I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: San Marzano

              I think Bart is confused, just as I am about this Cento issue, The currently have two different cans on the shelf - 1 has a San Marzano Certfied label and the 2nd has a organic D.O.P stamp verifying they meet the standards of the concortium. we have been trying tio find out the truth, are either or both actuallyD.O.P certifed

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: San Marzano

                They do have DOP, Italian grown san marzanos, and san marzanos grown in the US, each labeled as such.

                I just planted three san marzanos this weekend.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: San Marzano

                  I've been growing marzanos here in ohio since 1985. My neighbor brought the seeds from Italy, he had family there that shared a passion for gardening.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: San Marzano

                    This link is informative and explains the discrepancy. Evidentally, Cento is no longer "DOP Certified," now it is just "Certified" whatever that means....
                    San Marzano Tomatoes*-*The Italian Food Forum

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: San Marzano

                      IMHO: The best tomatoes are those you grow in your backyard and hand pick when ripe. The tomato type or strain you choose is entirely up to you.

                      Canned tomatoes - you get what you get, and the best-tasting (to you anyway) may not necessarily have the D.O.P. on side of the can.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: San Marzano

                        hey, I just like them cause they make good salsa

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: San Marzano

                          I saw this on Wikipedia. The original tomatoes came from Peru in South America.

                          Originally posted by Wikipedia

                          The story goes that the first seed of the San Marzano tomato came to Campania in 1770, as a gift from the Kingdom of Peru to the Kingdom of Naples, and that it was planted in the area that corresponds to the present commune of San Marzano. They come from a small town of the same name near Naples, Italy, and were first grown in volcanic soil in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius. Compared to the Roma tomatoes with which most people are familiar, Marzano tomatoes are thinner and pointier in shape. The flesh is much thicker with fewer seeds, and the taste is much stronger, more sweet and less acidic. Many people describe the taste as bittersweet, like high-quality chocolate. Because of their high quality and origins near Naples, San Marzano tomatoes have been designated as the only tomatoes that can be used for Vera Pizza Napoletana (True Neapolitan Pizza).[2]
                          The name denotes both a point of origin and a variety of tomato. Canned San Marzanos when grown in the Valle del Sarno (valley of the Sarno) in Italy in compliance with Italian law can be classified as Pomodoro S. Marzano dell'Agro Sarnese-Nocerino and have the EU "DOP" emblem on the label.
                          Though commercial production of the San Marzano variety is most closely associated with Italy, seeds for the variety are available worldwide, often labeled as an heirloom variety, frequently imported from Italy, and sold at a premium over more common varieties. The San Marzano vines are indeterminate and have a somewhat longer season than other paste tomato varieties, making them more suitable for warmer climates. As is typical of heirloom plants, San Marzano is an open-pollinated variety that breeds true from generation to generation, making seed saving practical for the home gardener or farmer.
                          Brands available in supermarkets include Cento, Nina, La Bella, Solinia, Vantia, and Strianese. Most San Marzano tomatoes sold commercially are grown in Italy, though they are produced commercially in smaller quantities in other countries.
                          Unfortunately because of San Marzano's premium pricing there is an on going battle against fraudulent product. On November 22nd of 2010 the Italian carabinieri confiscated 1,470 tons of canned tomatos worth 1.2 million of improperly labeled product, some branded with names mentioned above.
                          Lee B.
                          DFW area, Texas, USA

                          If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
                          Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
                          An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

                          I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: San Marzano

                            Originally posted by Lburou View Post
                            I read a thread here reporting that San Marzano tomato seeds are availabile here in the USA......You can grow them anywhere.
                            I have tried unsuccessfully for the last 2 seasons to grow SM tomatoes and the results were poor. I bought som DOP SMs from an Oz supplier some while ago to test and I didn't notice any significant difference between them ($8 per can) and the 49c cans I bought from the local supermarket I find it easier to just buy Roma tomatoes in cans or fresh at a much more reasonable price. The local tomatoes are pretty good and are fine for my pizza needs.
                            / Rossco

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: San Marzano

                              We planted about 12 "San Marzano" plants last week and they are still alilve. We also planted regular Romas, Moscow and celebrity varieties. We hope to bottle them and have them all year round.

                              We will let you know how they turn out.

                              Derk

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