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Bread Temperatures - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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  • Bread Temperatures

    Most of us are familiar with the temperatures specified for kneaded dough (77-81F) and fully baked hearth loaves (205F), but it has always puzzled me why temperatures are not given for fully risen dough. I just got Nancy Silverton's Breads from the LaBrea Bakery, and baked her renowned Olive and Thyme Boule in my brick oven yesterday. Turned out very well indeed. I'd post a pic, but it was all sold just after it came out of the oven. Anyway, on page 85, she writes that after the boules have retarded in the fridge for 8-12 hours: "Remove the boules from the refrigerator, take off the plastic wrap, and cover each basket with a cloth. Let the dough continue proofing at room temperature until it reaches and internal temperature of 58 degrees F, about 2 to 2 1/2 hours." Well, okay, mine reached 57, but the oven was right at its peak.

    She varies the temps somewhat from recipe to recipe, but this is the first time I've seen them given at all. Comments?

    On a related note, has anyone tried an oven thermometer with a long probe, the kind where the working bit stays outside the oven and the probe is inserted into whatever's being cooked? I'm an inveterate peeker, and this might break me of the habit if it will stand up to brick oven heat.

    Jim
    "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

  • #2
    Jim,

    Nice idea on testing the dough temperature. It's right up there with a digital scale. I guess bread just isn't as "recipe-less" as I am used to cooking. I will try that next and let you know how it works.

    Did it work for you? Did your refrigerated dough really bounce back in 2 1/2 hours?

    I made a focaccia for dinner on Saturday, and used the retarded dough method, and the focaccia had a great crust. Much better than my non-refrigerated doughs.

    Are you going to buy a long temperature probe? Send a picture.

    Thanks again for all the helpful info.
    James
    Pizza Ovens
    Outdoor Fireplaces

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    • #3
      Retarded Dough

      James,

      From the reading I've been doing, it seems that retarded dough is the way to go (rhyme), because the enzymes have a chance to do their magic while the yeast is semi-dormant. My boule dough did indeed bounce back in 2 hours, and was ready to go at 57 F. Looked into long probe thermometers, but the probes are only about six inches to a foot long; not long enough for my purposes. I'll keep checking though.

      Jim
      "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

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      • #4
        Temperature Probe

        We started using a compost tumbler this year. It came with a temperature probe that is about 18 inches long. It reads from 0 to 220 degrees. Their phone # is 888-820-5114. I hope this helps.---Mel

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        • #5
          I use one like this in my regular oven, the cord is 43" long, though the probe itself is only 7".

          Polder thermometer on Amazon.com
          My Oven Thread:
          http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/d...-oven-633.html

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          • #6
            Polder

            Drake,

            Thanks for that. All the ones I looked at, the cord was too short.

            Jim
            "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

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            • #7
              Be sure to pay close attention to the limits these type of thermometers work at. Most won't work at temps above 400. The wire is the problem, higher temps will melt it.

              I've used one for my low and slow cooking on my BGE for years and have always wanted one for the times I'm searing at 700 but haven't found one.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by stuart
                Be sure to pay close attention to the limits these type of thermometers work at. Most won't work at temps above 400. The wire is the problem, higher temps will melt it.

                I've used one for my low and slow cooking on my BGE for years and have always wanted one for the times I'm searing at 700 but haven't found one.

                That is a good point. The model I own is this one.
                http://www.polderproducts.net/ProductDetail.asp?PID=150

                It is a "dual sensor" that measures the internal and the oven temps. It says it measures up to 572 F. I don't know how it will do at high oven temps...

                Drake
                My Oven Thread:
                http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/d...-oven-633.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Therms

                  Drake and Stuart,

                  Thanks for the details. I was about to pull the trigger on the Polder, but I'm baking at much higher temperatures, so the thing would probably melt into a pool of useless wire. I'll keep looking for something that will withstand temps in the 700 + range. Another question: does anyone know the make and model of an oven air temp gauge that reads above 600 F? I think, maybe, that Tayolor makes one that goes to 800, but I'm not sure. Thanks for the help.

                  Jim
                  "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

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