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Hamelman Multi-Flour Miche - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community



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Hamelman Multi-Flour Miche

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  • Hamelman Multi-Flour Miche

    I made the Hamelman Mixed Flour Miche this weekend. 30% KA whole wheat, 30% KA light whole wheat, 20% KA general purpose and 20% rye. One thing that was interesting, was that I actually read the recipe. Duh.

    The first few times I made this bread, I basically followed the Vermont Sourdough method with the Miche recipe -- but the actual technique is different.

    1. Place the loaves in the proofing basket seam side up (not down), which promotes the low profile characteristic is this bread.

    2. Bake at 440F for 60 minutes (lower and longer than the basic sourdough), and lower the temp to 420F after 15 minutes (though a brick oven does this naturally). Due to the high water content, the bread requires a full and long bake. Wow, I didn't burn the crust trying to get the crumb to finish baking.

    3. Cool on a rack wrapped in bakers linen.

    4. Let rest for 12 hours.

    Too funny. It's amazing what you learn when you actually read the darn recipe. Anyway, I tried to do it right and I'm happy with the result. It is definitely less dense and it has the right profile. The different flours work very well together, and I even got nice hole development. This is a peasant bread that will last all week.

    Now all I need is an old farmhouse.
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    Last edited by james; 11-10-2008, 10:28 AM.
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