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Giustos bread flour

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  • Giustos bread flour

    I got my three bags of Giustos flour (two bread flours and a whole wheat flour), and they are excellent. The whole wheat is rich and dark, and it looks like it was milled yesterday. I've already done whole wheat bread once, and have another batch going today.

    Highly recommended.
    James
    Pizza Ovens
    Outdoor Fireplaces

  • #2
    Originally posted by james
    I got my three bags of Giustos flour (two bread flours and a whole wheat flour), and they are excellent. The whole wheat is rich and dark, and it looks like it was milled yesterday. I've already done whole wheat bread once, and have another batch going today.

    Highly recommended.
    James


    I had been looking for Italian flours for some time now, but confused as to what to get. For I am making a few wild yeast starters, for my traditional Italian breads, and need the flours to complete the process.

    Where did you buy those Giustos flours from?

    THX

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    • #3
      Buongiorno,

      I think the Caputo flour is good for focaccia, schiacciatta and other flat bread, and for a light and airy loaves, such as Ciabatta and even baguettes.

      For heavier breads, including Pugliese, I would use American bread flour. We have some great choices here. King Arthur is good, and Giustos is excellent.

      You can buy Giustos on line (which is what I do).

      http://www.worldpantry.com/cgi-bin/n...hop.d2w/report

      It's a little more expensive, but like the Caputo flour, I think it's worth it.

      James
      Last edited by james; 06-01-2006, 11:20 AM.
      Pizza Ovens
      Outdoor Fireplaces

      Comment


      • #4
        Pugliese

        James,

        For Pugliese, you might also try using fancy durham semolia flour (not the coarse grind used for dusting peels and the like). I get mine from a flour and grain seller in Toronto's St. Lawrence Market (ask joe engineer about that place). I gives a really wonderful nutty flavour to Pugliese, and, besides, its traditional.

        Jim
        "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827

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