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I'm building a bread loader or two. - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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I'm building a bread loader or two.

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  • I'm building a bread loader or two.

    I'll be putting together a couple of very basic bread loaders, one for my WFO and one for my kitchen oven. One motivation for building these loaders is to broaden the bread shapes that I'm doing to include baguettes and other more delicate shapes. The other motivation is more effective and quicker loading of these ovens. Using a peel to load 12 loaves and keep the spacing, isn't all that difficult, but by using a loader I can really control how the shaped loaves are laid into the oven and do the loading quicker.

    If my math is correct, my WFO loader will cover a maximum floor space of 36" deep by 20" wide. I think I can use a quality birch cabinet plywood as the support structure for a linen conveyor. The loaders that I see used commercially are stainless covered with some fabric that the shaped loaves are placed and slashed just before being push into the oven. The loader is then magically removed as it deposits the loaves softly on the oven deck in a smooth motion. If you haven’t seen a loader, just search youtube.
    I’ll include pictures and drawings as I go along. Please don't expect any fancy, I just want something that works as intended.

    Chris

  • #2
    Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

    Chris,

    Do you have a specific link that you are trying to emulate? Your approach will be fun to watch.
    Check out my pictures here:
    http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/les-build-4207.html

    If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

      I have no specific link, but here is one for reference. Of course I only need 36 by 20, this is enough for 8, 9 inch, 800g boules or, 12, 18 inch long baguettes. I'll have space on the side that I think I can put 4 additional boules or baguettes.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCXzQhxsTyc

      Chris

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      • #4
        Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

        Awesome. I was in Boudin's in San Fran and never paid attention to how the bread was loaded into the ovens. Watching the link I still don't see how it is released so easily. I would have a bunch of "balls" sitting next to the back wall Keep us posted and thanks! Still learning...
        Check out my pictures here:
        http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/les-build-4207.html

        If at first you don't succeed... Skydiving isn't for you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

          It sounds like you're building a mega-Superpeel. Linen from SBFI http://www.sfbi.com/linen_canvas_couche.html should work. There are some good photos of the commercial ones on page 6 of this catalog (I think these are the ones TMB Baking imports): SASA Cata GB01032011

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          • #6
            Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

            I hesitated to include the link because what I intend to make is only a distant cousin of the commercial versions. Les, what is happening is that the supporting peel is being pulled back by the linen as the linen is pulled underneath. The loaves are stationary relative to the oven floor and the linen loops back underneath. As I see it there are really three main components;
            The supporting peel, for lack of a better name.
            The linen that lays on the supporting peel
            A board or some such that connects to the top end of the linen and anchors this end outside the oven floor. This board's position is the reference point that positions the rest of the device. It's just a mega-Superpeel.

            Chris

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            • #7
              Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

              I've been thinking of a similar device. I wonder how well a loader like that would work with a round oven though. Have fun....I'll be watching to see what you come up with.

              ~Aaron

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              • #8
                Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                I ordered 3 yards of 18 inch wide linen from SFBI to act as the conveyor. I'll need to find a of good half inch plywood to support the linen conveyor and loaves, this may need to be replaced with something more heat resistant.. We'll see.. My feeling is that the heat will be brief enough that the ply will last for some reasonable time. I don't know how the linen will react to the brief exposure to heat.

                Oh I also ordered 4 more 8 inch linen lined baskets, that makes 12 round proofing baskets.

                Chris
                Last edited by SCChris; 02-26-2013, 12:39 PM.

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                • #9
                  Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                  Wow! How cool is that?

                  Can't wait to see how you do it. I may have a project (after I watch you do it.)

                  On a related note, Laurentis asked me in another thread how long it takes me to load 16 loaves. As part of calculating an answer, I went through the various steps required. One of the steps was slashing loaves and my estimate was ten seconds per loaf. Probablly about right for me. But did you see how fast that guy was slashing loaves in that youtube video?

                  He slashed 29 loaves in sixteen seconds. Almost two loaves per second. Unbelievable.

                  Bill

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                  • #10
                    Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                    Originally posted by WJW View Post
                    Wow! How cool is that?

                    Can't wait to see how you do it. I may have a project (after I watch you do it.)

                    On a related note, Laurentis asked me in another thread how long it takes me to load 16 loaves. As part of calculating an answer, I went through the various steps required. One of the steps was slashing loaves and my estimate was ten seconds per loaf. Probablly about right for me. But did you see how fast that guy was slashing loaves in that youtube video?

                    He slashed 29 loaves in sixteen seconds. Almost two loaves per second. Unbelievable.

                    Bill
                    Great idea I am thinking of a possible side loader and an end loader because of the round oven.

                    I think an aluminum frame with a couple of rollers and linen would work quite well.

                    I will keep an eye out and be trying a parallel design.

                    Chip
                    Chip

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                      Hi Chris!

                      I got to use a commercial loader at SFBI. They are literally awesome. The trick will lie in backing the plywood out at a rate matching the speed of the belt. Success would be awesome!

                      Good Luck!
                      Jay

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                        To be honest, I don't see an easy way to handle loading an oven with baguettes without some sort of loader. I love the look of the boules that I'm producing; the crumb and crust are really feeling right. The addition of the retarded soaker and fresh milled flour, have helped put the flavor where I like them. I feel really good about the boules, but I can’t help but feel that the Battard and Baguette shapes are more user friendly. They are easier and safer to slice by the recipients of these loaves. Anyway the baguette can be a nice complement to the boule. This can really become true if the Boules are higher percentages of Whole Wheat or Rye where they may get better with a day of rest after baking. Additionally where the baguettes want a hotter oven and a shorter bake the boules will be happier to be the second bake out of the WFO.

                        Chris

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                        • #13
                          Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                          The normal way of handling baguettes is a long thin board. Flip it over/upside down from the couche onto the board, then onto the loader. When the loader is full, slash and load the oven. Wonderful! I agree, peels don't really work so well for baguettes in my experience. Be warned! Forming baguettes can be distinctly challenging. The SFBI Artisanal I is almost nothing but baguettes and while I made beautiful ones there, getting the dough just right and forming at home has never achieved the same levels!

                          The retard with the fresh flour is a nice touch. I began using fresh flour at 5 to 10% years ago and the aromatic benefits are really nice. You are no doubt using more! For baguettes I think I would presoak/autolyse the fresh flour to get it broken down a bit before mixing with the starter. Have you tried that?

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                          • #14
                            Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                            I'm prepared for the Baguettes I know they are going to be a shaping challenge and I'll likely work with very plain dough to start and then shift the recipe as I get a feel for the shape, the bake and the rest of it. I may even go with instant dry yeast in AP and retarded dough to start with. Practice, practice, practice.. My reasoning to build a little loader for the home oven is that I can gain shaping experience and run four loaves at a bake. I'll be ordering a 1" thick custom cut cordite shelf from the ceramics outlet to replace the granite that's in place right now, this should mimic the WFO a bit better than the granite. Bit by Bit, One problem at a time..

                            Chris

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: I'm building a bread loader or two.

                              We made baguettes, boules, batards, epis, etc. all from the same basic dough - a 73% hydration (as I recall) straight dough (water, flour, yeast, diastatic malt). We did use different processes (slow, fast, modified proofing programs) but the slow and modified doughs were pretty similar. You want the baguette dough to be about as wet as you can handle w/o sticking. Linen is IMO mandatory. A little IDY boost is not a bad idea for you want the dough gassy and light.

                              And you were definitely right (in the other chain) that bigger batches are different. Batches over about ten pounds behave rather differently from small batches and heat and moisture loss are two of the key factors. The mass of a big batch gives it a stability of temp such that you get the dough temp right and it will GO! On a very reliable schedule. Also has a different feel IMO which I think is gassyness/lightness/bounciness.

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