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Cold Fermented Bread - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Cold Fermented Bread

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  • Cold Fermented Bread

    2 cups warm water
    1 tsp yeast
    2 tsp salt
    bread flour

    Put 2 cups flour, salt, and yeast into a plastic tub. Add water and stir with a wooden spoon. Add flour stiring with a wooden spoon until bread pulls away from tub walls.

    Put lid on tub and weight down with 2 bricks. Ferment at approximatly 40 degrees (outside) overnight.

    Knead/fold dough making at least 10 folds stretching as you go.

    Place dough in long rising basket forming a long loaf.

    Bring bread into house at 68 degrees and let rise until doubled.

    Cook at 425 degrees in a wood fired oven for 30 minutes until bread reaches 200 degrees internal temperature.

    The emphasis on this method of outdoor cooking is because my 12 year old son has an extreme form of celiac disease. Gluten causes him to stop breathing. Even smelling bread cooking or pasta boiling causes an asthma attack. This means all bread is made and baked on the back porch. I am allowed to bring the dough in to rise if the basket is dusted with rice flour instead of wheat flour.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by sacwoodpusher; 12-25-2010, 09:34 PM. Reason: correction

  • #2
    Re: Cold Fermented Bread

    Bread looks good

    Kudos to you for finding a way to make this happen regardless of your health situation
    Lee B.
    DFW area, Texas, USA

    If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.
    Our One Meter Pompeii Oven album is here.
    An album showing our Thermal Breaks is Here.

    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

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