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Bread Machine or Mixer? - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community



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Bread Machine or Mixer?

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  • Bread Machine or Mixer?

    Is there a bread machine that people know of that can be programmed to knead the dough and then electronically stop before cooking? Also, do people have favorite mixers for bread and pizza dough? Has anyone tried the Bosch Universal Mixer or the Swedish-made 8 quart Electrolux Mixer?

  • #2
    Bread machine

    Most bread machines have a dough setting. I have been using mine for that purpose. Mine will make a one or two pound ball ready to use in an hour and twenty minutes. It even had a recipe that tastes great. I beleve ours is a Breadman.


    • #3

      In the past, I kneaded all my bread by hand, but as the volumes went up, the biceps went down. Recently, I bought the 6 qt. Kitchen Aid Mixer. It's a horse and works quite quickly. The only problem I'm having with it is overmixing the dough. It seems quite a bit faster than the kneading times given in books like The Bread Baker's Apprentice. If Reinhart suggests six minutes, typically I'll knead for three, then use the windowpane test and take the dough's temperature. Gluten development seems strong, but I usually finish off the kneading by hand for a minute or three.
      "Made are tools, and born are hands"--William Blake, 1757-1827